You are here: [ RESOURCESMEGAN STEVENS: DRAKE LETTERS ► 20. DRAKE TO LOUISA 22 SEPTEMBER 1854 ]

Drake Letters Index 19. Drake to Louisa 20 September 1854 ◄ ● ► 21. Drake to Louisa 27 September 1854
The Drake Letters
 
William Henry Drake (aboard Hope) № 10 - Louisa Drake (London), 22 - 23 September 1854
№ 10

My dear Lu,
Steamer Hope, Loucoul or Ulukul Bay
22 Sept 1854 – 1
 
        I sent my last by the Admirals Bag yesterday in a great hurry & I also wrote to Sir C Trevelyan a short note about the action as the C.G. 2 I thought could not write being inland
 
It has been a great Victory purchased at a great Expense of life   Our Soldiers stormed a height that was quite equal to most Fortifications Annapolis ramparts are about 1/3 of the height & a deep & broad rise at their foot – The Russian Army laughed at the idea of our taking this position the men believed it impregnable & fought accordingly, they were many of them well primed also with Spirits – The Army has lost from 500 to 600 killed & 800 or 900 wounded   The French 250 killed & 300 wounded   It is said the Russians have lost 2000 men & upwards   Three Generals & 3 Cannons 2 of 32 & 1 of 24 lbs., were taken by us – Caps Helmets Musquets Swords Bullets & all sorts of Trophies are being brought on board every Ship   I enclose some part of a printed Almanac & prayer 3 it was taken from the hand of a man who has used the part torn off as a wad to a broken Cartridge he was killed by our Guards with the Ball in the muzzle of his gun – I was awake at 4 this morning & as I had little to do myself helped the Navy in getting off the Wounded – Two Russian Officers among others one spoke French, the other German the latter was a Cadet   There are doubts as to the March hence to Sevastopol   Reports differ some say at the Katzka River there are other entrenchments & others that there are none on this side the City [of Sevastopol] but all agree this is the Strongest as the Highest land is on this side of the Katzka & consequently in our favor – The 23 Regt. 4 have lost 400 men & are under command of a Captain – But every one I have heard speak of our loss concur in one opinion, that much of it was occasioned by the inefficiency of our Genl. Commg. 5 of course I am not competent to judge of it & so give no opinion of my own, Brigadier Genl. Tylden R.E. 6 taken with Cholera last night & not expected to recover   Lt. Col. Seymour 7 on Genl. Cathcart’s 8 Staff went on board ill yesterday he is better today – Diarrhœa is still very prevalent among the Troops – I have got a Russian Eagle off the Cap of a Chasseur killed in the action & sundry memorials of the Battle   I suppose they will call it of Alma or the passage of the Alma
 
I am writing in a desperate hurry & very uncomfortably as I am just at present mighty busy but as a Second Vessel goes today or tomorrow morng. I send this for fear the last has not got to hand – & to let you know that I am not among the killed or wounded.
 
Your affectionate Hub
W. H. Drake.

 
23. All Well   W. H. D.
 
Army will advance tomorrow morning
 
 
 
© COPYRIGHT MEGAN STEVENS 2015 —
Footnotes
 
1. Private family manuscript (Judith Hall and Sally Mac, Auckland, New Zealand).
 
2. Commissary-General William Filder, C.B.
 
3. This page has not survived.
 
4. 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers Regiment of Foot.
 
5. Lord Fitzroy James Henry Somerset Raglan, Commander-in-Chief.
 
6. Brigadier General William Burton Tylden, R.E., died of cholera on 22 September 1854.
 
7. Lt.-Col. Charles Francis Seymour, S.F.G., died at the Battle of Inkerman on 5 November 1854.
 
8. Sir George Cathcart.
 
 
 

 
© COPYRIGHT MEGAN STEVENS 2015 —
Drake Letters Index 19. Drake to Louisa 20 September 1854 ◄ ● ► 21. Drake to Louisa 27 September 1854