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Megan Stevens: Drake Letters ◄ ● ► 2. Charlotte Augusta Drake to Louisa 29 May 1854
The Drake Letters
 
William Henry Drake (off Ireland) - Louisa Drake (Canada), 7 April 1854
At Sea, Off Ireland,
Friday 7th April 1854 1

 
My dear Lu,
 
        I had intended chronicling our voyage but it has been so monotonous & unmarked that I have had nothing to write about One day telling the tale of all – We got as I wrote you safely to Halifax – The whole of the 72 were on board to see us – The Admiral did not come, in lieu we had Colonel Bazalgette 2   going home on leave – We left there on Thursday night about 11½ OCk next day ran along Sable Island & have daily made some 300 to 320 miles having very fine weather – no rain, no blow – We get on very quietly not seeing much of the ladies of our table I feel rather mopy wanting you to have a chat with, about things around – I write with a gold stick & the motion from the Engine is very great today.
 
Mrs. Cunard was the Miss Haliburton 3   staying with Mr. J. H. Gray 4   when we first went to St John 5   – a very agreeable nice person – Mrs. Bayman has not appeared for the last four or five days having the Measles. – This is kept a profound secret. Last night at 12 we passed the Collin's boat bound to New York (The Arctic I believe) 6   & as we exchanged Rockets she will probably report us so far all well & safe
 
at 5 this morning we made the land, Ireland & have been running a few miles from it ever since can see houses & fires on shore. The Lighthouse on Cape Clear between this & the light on the Gannet rock we passed Bantry Bay opening was plain – this is all very nice We are doing nothing but eat & drink all day the peoples are now at lunch I write this to despatch tomorrow by Cunard Steamer to New York tomorrow
 
No. 2
 
the Asia I believe, We shall be in too much bustle in the morning, so I make sure We expect to be at the Wharf at Liverpool tomorrow at 7 in the Morning 7 – the quickest passage yet made I believe I shall leave for London by a train so as to arrive before 8 or 9 tomorrow Evg. in fact as soon as I can get my Baggage passed through the Customs which I think will be before 12 noon Trains run up in 5 or 6 hours I shall keep this open to add my last words on our arrival or at least until the Bag they make up on board is closed for the outward going Boat – Kiss the girls & fancy  [sp?]  one from
 
Your affectionate husband
W. H. D.

 
Off Tuscar light, Ireland at 9 P.M. the Letter Bag is closing – we now stand over towards the Isle of Anglesey distant 90 miles then to L'pool 50 miles expect to be there at 7 or 8 A.M. Tomorrow morng. Saturday.
 
W. H. D.
 

 
WH Drake Journal
 
May 20th, Saturday at ½ past 9 took leave of my Father 8   & Mother, 9   & C. A. D. 10   at Park Village St. Went to S.W. Railway Station, joined Mr. Jackson of the Treasury with £10,000. Went to Southampton, & embarked on board the Rl. West Ind. Mail St. Orinoco, Capt. Anty. Wilson, 2,991 tons. Col. Lockyer 11   & 97th Regt. embarked, & at 5 p.m. we went down Southampton Water, anchoring opposite Netley Abbey. During the night the sailing orders were recd.
 
[May] 27th. At 4 a.m. I got up. Steamer coaling. Weir came on board about 7½. Haines, 12   & several officers from the Corps on shore, visited the ship, which got under weigh & left Gibraltar at 10 a.m. Col. Lockyer told me that he had read his secret instructions, but did not at present intend to make our plan of disembarkation generally known. I gave Mr. Weir 13   the public letters I had for him. Mr. Pratt, Temp. Ck., 14   came off with Mr. Weir. Bandmaster of the 97th, Oleivara [sp?], 15   landed, & remained at Gibraltar. Weather fine.
 
 
© COPYRIGHT MEGAN STEVENS 2015 —
Footnotes
 
1. Private family manuscript (Judith Hall and Sally Mac, Auckland, New Zealand).
 
2. Col. John Bazalgette, retired 11 November 1851.
 
3. Laura Charlotte Haliburton married William Cunard   ghgraham.org/williamcunard1825.html [accessed 30 April 2015]
 
4. John Hamilton Gray, 2nd Premier of New Brunswick (1856-1857).
 
5. St. John, New Brunswick.
 
6. LIVERPOOL, APRIL 5. – SAILED. – The Arctic (U.S.M.S.) for New York, … [“SHIPPING.” Morning Chronicle [London, England] 6 April 1854: n.p. 19th Century British Newspapers. Web. 18 June 2013.]
 
7. ARRIVAL OF THE STEAM–SHIP ARABIA. LIVERPOOL, SATURDAY. By the arrival this forenoon of the British and North American Royal Mail steamp–ship [sic] Arabia, Captain C. H. E. Judkins, we are put in possession of later advices from the United States and British North American possessions. The Arabia sailed from Boston at noon on the 29th ult., and on the 30th, at 9 a.m., passed the Canada, from hence, and arrived at Halifax at 9.35 p.m. After a delay of two hours in landing the mails she proceeded on her voyage. April 3rd passed the British ship Toronto, Canada west; 6th signalled the barque Atlas, from Trinidad, to Greenock; 7th, at 0.30 a.m., exchanged night signals with a steamer, bound west (the Arctic), and at 9.50 a.m. passed Cape Clear. [Daily News (London, England), Monday, April 10, 1854.]
 
8. CG John Drake.
 
9. Maria Drake (née Story).
 
10. Henry's unmarried sister, Charlotte Augusta Drake.
 
11. Colonel Henry Fred. Lockyer, K.H., 97th Regiment.
 
12. Capt. Edward Eldridge Haines, transcribed as Naines.
 
13. DCG Thomas Christie Bartrum Weir.
 
14. Commissariat Clerk Pratt is mentioned as being on board the Orinoco on its arrival at Malta on 1st June 1854. [The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, June 13, 1854.]
 
15. I am unsure as to what the exact name of the bandmaster of the 97th Regiment was. I did however, find the following reference to him: “12 March 1853, Halifax, Nova Scotia. From Henry Oldright. – I shall have some good phonographers in the public class which I am now teaching. I have one very interesting pupil, an Italian gentleman, the bandmaster of the 97th regiment. He is delighted with Phonotypy. He actually read a sentence in Phonotypy after a very short explanation of one or two new letters, much better than he can read a sentence in the old orthography, which he has been studying for years. [The Phonetic Journal [Pitman's Journal] for the year 1853, Vol. 12, (London, Fred Pitman), p. 82.]”
 
 
 

 
© COPYRIGHT MEGAN STEVENS 2015 —
Megan Stevens: Drake Letters ◄ ● ► 2. Charlotte Augusta Drake to Louisa 29 May 1854